Butterfly Effect: Series 2 (2017) Gutenberg

Butterfly Effect Series 2 6of7 Gutenberg
Butterfly Effect: Series 2
Turning points in history often hinge on one decision. We look at moments in history where one decision changes everything.
This is a continuation of Season 2

Part 7. Dunkirk Resist at All Costs HAS ALREADY BEEN RELEASED

Part 1: Istanbul from One Empire to the Other
Constantinople was a part of the Roman Empire, then became the seat of the Byzantine Empire and then was the imperial city of the Ottoman Empire. Here is the story of the fabled city and its history of power and conflict through the ages.


Part 2: Aral a Sea for Cotton
The former Soviet Union collectivized many aspects of agricultural and industrial development in the 1950’s. While some efforts were successful, others, like the cotton-growing around the Aral Sea, have proven to be an ecological nightmare.


Part 3: The Fall of Quebec France Loses America
The battle between the French and English for the French territory of New France hinges on the presence of the British navy. And the Battle on the Plains of Abraham is tipped to Great Britain by the solidly trained soldiers of the British army. This changed the landscape of North America.


Part 4: The Fronde
In the 17th century, a long period of civil war in France and war across Europe, rebellious members of the French Parliament, dubbed The Fronde, defy the monarchy and this defiance does not end well for them…and changes the history of France.


Part 5: The Olympic Games a Mirror to Society
How did one man succeed in relaunching the Olympic spirit and turn the Games into a global event?


Part 6: Gutenberg
In the 15th century, an inventor in a workshop in Strasburg came up with a machine that would eventually change the history of the entire world and shake a religion to its core. The choice of the first work to be printed is an astute one: Saint Jeromes Latin version of the Bible.


Part 7: Dunkirk Resist at All Costs
The dramatic story of the defense of France against Hitler’s invading army in order to enable the desperate evacuation of over 300K men of the British Expeditionary Force and Allied troops across the English Channel to safety in 1940.

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